Sonneillon V.

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A word about bronies.

saintcheshire:

So I just got back last night from a brony convention in San Francisco. I was working a booth for a vendor friend, and let me tell you what happened:

We met a little girl who was there with her family. She got a button drawn at our booth, told us all about her favorite…

(Source: princess-nietzsche)

  • jk rowling’s reasoning as to why fenrir greyback turned remus into a werewolf: remus’s father insulted him so he did it as an act of revenge

  • the actual reason greyback bit remus: the temptation to succumb to the fact that biting remus whose name literally means ‘werewolf’ would be the greatest feat in lycanthropic irony the world had ever seen

But was it RAPE-rape?

andythanfiction:

  • They kissed.
  • She liked it.
  • His mouth moved down her neck.
  • She said no.
  • Twisted away.
  • He kept going.
  • Shut her mouth with more kisses.
  • She said no.
  • He kissed her again and again harder.
  • She said no again and again with a half dozen different reasons and arguments.
  • He…

raehex:

killedmycatatemytailor:

oopstheregoesmysoul:

ohsandor:

Welcome back, Jaime (ノ◕ヮ◕)ノ*:・゚✧

you can see him realizing that almost his entire family is comprised of douchebags

Jaime’s character growth gives me life.

Jaime’s wondering “why the fuck did I even come back.”

errors-dot-albi:

theuppitynegras:

whitegirlsaintshit:

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 
The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.
An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.
For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.
It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.
That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.
This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…
(Read Full Text)

I said this when I was in fucking ninth grade and wrote a twelve paged paper on it and my teacher told me that I was a conspiracy theorist and that I needed a realistic topic. ok.

I highkey was saying this all along


shit we’ve known for YEARS

errors-dot-albi:

theuppitynegras:

whitegirlsaintshit:

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

I said this when I was in fucking ninth grade and wrote a twelve paged paper on it and my teacher told me that I was a conspiracy theorist and that I needed a realistic topic. ok.

I highkey was saying this all along

shit we’ve known for YEARS

dankiidoll:

westerbroski:

triggerlocke:

submissivefeminist:

I love this commercial for really obvious reasons.

WHY HAVE I NEVER THOUGHT OF DOING THIS?!

shhh

just watch

Living the dream

lacalacabby:

Can we make a petition for Oded Fehr to be cast as Doctor Strange? Is it possible because it needs to be done.

I wouldn’t necessarily mind people not knowing I’m gay, but I don’t like being thought of as straight — in the same way that I don’t mind people not knowing I’m a writer, but it would be awkward if they assumed I was an extreme skateboarder, because that’s so far removed from the reality of my life. But there is no blank slate where orientation is concerned; we are straight until proven otherwise. And if you’ve never seen how dramatically a conversation can be derailed by a casual admission of homosexuality, let me tell you, it gets awkward.

- My Life as an Invisible Queer - Cosmopolitan (via feministlibrarian)

thefreshprinceofevangelion:

yo Laverne Cox dropped from number 1 on that Time’s poll and Benedict Cumberbatch is beating her out by 400 votes cmon everyone go vote for her!!!

homewardwishes:

Salted Caramel Cheesecake Pie
makes one 9-inch pie
adapted from Dorie Greenspan and Zoe Nathan
For the Crust:
2 cups ginger snap cookie crumbs
2 tablespoons brown sugar
pinch of salt
1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, melted
For the Cheesecake:
1 pound (2 blocks) cream cheese, at room temperature
1 1/3 cups granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
2 large eggs, at room temperature
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream
1 teaspoon lemon zest (optional)
For the Caramel:
1/2 cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons light corn syrup
1/3 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
Place two rack in the upper and bottom third of the oven.  Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.  You’ll need a 9-inch pie plate and a 9×13-inch pan for boiling water.
To make the crust, place cookies in the bowl of a food processor and grind to a fine crumb.  If you don’t have a food processor you can crumble cookies in a zip lock bag with a rolling pin.  Once you’ve created a fine crumb, add brown sugar, salt, and butter.  Toss together, moistening all of the ginger snap crumbs.  Pour the mixture into a 9-inch pie plate and press with fingers until sides and bottom are evenly coated with crust.
Bake for 10 to 15 minutes until golden brown.  Remove from the oven and allow to cool while you make the cheesecake filling.  Reduce the oven temperature to 325 degrees F.  Place a tea kettle of water on the stove top to boil.  We’re going to add hot water to the 9×13-inch pan to place under the baking cheesecake.
To make the cheesecake filling:  In the bowl of an electric stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, beat together cream cheese and granulated sugar.  Beat until light and fluffy, about 3 to 5 minutes.  Beat in salt and vanilla extract until well incorporated.    Add eggs, beating one at a time between each addition.  Once creamy and smooth, slowly beat in the cream, beating on medium high until creamy and luscious.  Add lemon zest if using.
Pour cheesecake mixture into the prepared cheesecake crust.
Place 9×13-inch pan in the bottom shelf  of the hot oven.  Carefully pout in hot water, and fill to 1/2 full.  Push into oven.
Place cheesecake on the upper oven shelf.  Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until cheesecake is browned and puffed.  When cheesecake is puffed and doesn’t have  loose giggle in the center, turn oven off and use a towel to prop the oven open slightly.  Let cheesecake rest for another 45 minutes in the cooling oven.  Remove from the oven and cool completely, for at least 4 hours.  Overnight is best.
While the cheesecake cools, make the caramel so it can cool as well.
To make the caramel, add sugar, water, and corn syrup to a medium saucepan.  Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring once or twice.  Bring to a boil and allow to brown.  Once sugar has browned to a medium amber color, remove from heat and immediately add heavy cream and butter.  Mixture will boil and foam.  Stir well.  Add salt and stir well to incorporate.  Caramel may seem thin… that’s ok.  Place in a bowl.  Cover with plastic wrap and cool in the fridge for at least 4 hours, overnight is best.
Pour the cooled caramel over the cooled cheesecake,  return to the refrigerator until ready to serve.  Sprinkle with a dash of sea salt then slice and serve.
Cheese will last for up to 4 days, well wrapped in the refrigerator.

homewardwishes:

Salted Caramel Cheesecake Pie

makes one 9-inch pie

adapted from Dorie Greenspan and Zoe Nathan

For the Crust:

2 cups ginger snap cookie crumbs

2 tablespoons brown sugar

pinch of salt

1/2 stick (4 tablespoons) unsalted butter, melted

For the Cheesecake:

1 pound (2 blocks) cream cheese, at room temperature

1 1/3 cups granulated sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

2 large eggs, at room temperature

1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream

1 teaspoon lemon zest (optional)

For the Caramel:

1/2 cup granulated sugar

2 tablespoons water

2 tablespoons light corn syrup

1/3 cup heavy cream

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Place two rack in the upper and bottom third of the oven.  Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.  You’ll need a 9-inch pie plate and a 9×13-inch pan for boiling water.

To make the crust,
place cookies in the bowl of a food processor and grind to a fine crumb.  If you don’t have a food processor you can crumble cookies in a zip lock bag with a rolling pin.  Once you’ve created a fine crumb, add brown sugar, salt, and butter.  Toss together, moistening all of the ginger snap crumbs.  Pour the mixture into a 9-inch pie plate and press with fingers until sides and bottom are evenly coated with crust.

Bake for 10 to 15 minutes until golden brown.  Remove from the oven and allow to cool while you make the cheesecake filling.  Reduce the oven temperature to 325 degrees F.  Place a tea kettle of water on the stove top to boil.  We’re going to add hot water to the 9×13-inch pan to place under the baking cheesecake.

To make the cheesecake filling:  
In the bowl of an electric stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, beat together cream cheese and granulated sugar.  Beat until light and fluffy, about 3 to 5 minutes.  Beat in salt and vanilla extract until well incorporated.    Add eggs, beating one at a time between each addition.  Once creamy and smooth, slowly beat in the cream, beating on medium high until creamy and luscious.  Add lemon zest if using.

Pour cheesecake mixture into the prepared cheesecake crust.

Place 9×13-inch pan in the bottom shelf  of the hot oven.  Carefully pout in hot water, and fill to 1/2 full.  Push into oven.

Place cheesecake on the upper oven shelf.  Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, until cheesecake is browned and puffed.  When cheesecake is puffed and doesn’t have  loose giggle in the center, turn oven off and use a towel to prop the oven open slightly.  Let cheesecake rest for another 45 minutes in the cooling oven.  Remove from the oven and cool completely, for at least 4 hours.  Overnight is best.

While the cheesecake cools, make the caramel so it can cool as well.

To make the caramel, add sugar, water, and corn syrup to a medium saucepan.  Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring once or twice.  Bring to a boil and allow to brown.  Once sugar has browned to a medium amber color, remove from heat and immediately add heavy cream and butter.  Mixture will boil and foam.  Stir well.  Add salt and stir well to incorporate.  Caramel may seem thin… that’s ok.  Place in a bowl.  Cover with plastic wrap and cool in the fridge for at least 4 hours, overnight is best.

Pour the cooled caramel over the cooled cheesecake,  return to the refrigerator until ready to serve.  Sprinkle with a dash of sea salt then slice and serve.

Cheese will last for up to 4 days, well wrapped in the refrigerator.